Let’s talk about ethical issues in machine law. Specifically, I want to discuss the question of Artificial Intelligence and legal personhood. Could we grant an A.I. civil rights and let it represent itself or get represented by a lawyer in a court of law? Roman Yampolskiy, in his inspiring article: AI Personhood: Rights and Laws, discusses the possibility of legal representation of A.I.’s, its role in business automation, problems, difficulties, moral dilemmas and possible solutions.

Non-human entities like legal firms, corporations and governments are known to possess legal personhood. Yampolskiy argues that certain legal rights and privileges could be granted…


Agamben’s Reflections on Language: A Reconstruction

Language presupposes being. When we speak, an ontology is already given. There is a powerful sense in which language does not possess a history, for history is written through language. History presupposes language and language presupposes being, but to presuppose being means something very different, because being can never presuppose anything. That which presupposes being has no origin.

So there is something about language that is already done. We are faced with an insurmountable paradox. On the one hand language is self-limiting as it can posit itself as an object of investigation, creating the illusion that it is an object…


Some Classical (unfinished) Old-School Philosophy

We cannot meaningfully ask: “What is a Being?” What does it mean ‘to be’? We have to be — in order to ask the question in the first place. Being is the necessary condition for posing the question of being. But you understand the question. That’s the problem. We simultaneously grasp the question together with its impossibility. Let’s call this: The Quasi-Meaningful statement. The quasi-meaningful statement is in fact a being’s self-questioning, which is also the existential human condition. Get it? You are a being. Existentially, the question “What is a Being?” is structurally identical…


The Irony behind Anti-Plagiarism Software

Feeling powerless is the direct expression of a loss in agency. Educational environments are becoming increasingly constraining and the process keeps accelerating exponentially with the implementation of modern technologies.

“It often seems like a struggle to construct agency amidst the many technological interfaces (many that I haven’t autonomously chosen for myself) that I encounter in both my scholarly and personal life”Tim Amidon

Amidon continues to argue that interfaces, far from being value-neutral, are in fact laden with power-relationships. They are implicitly geared towards exclusion, as they tend to increase the distance between teachers…


Reflections on Bionormativity

“If as many Google- enabled robotic devices get installed as Google hopes, Google may soon know the contents of your fridge, your heart rate when you’re exercising, the weather outside your front door, the pattern of electricity use in your home”

Bernard Harcourt - Exposed: Desire and Disobedience in the Digital Age

Authentication and Verification: Defining the Problem

Throughout his career, one of the central concerns for Foucault’s work was to investigate, analyze and offer a genealogical account of truth-telling as a mode of subjectivation. The notion of Biopolitics implies many different ways of conceiving the modern problem of truth-politics…


Decolonizing Mathematical Knowledge

What happens after typing “sociology of mathematics” into the google search bar? The very first “suggested” result is mathematical sociology. A very curious outcome, considering the fact that mathematical sociology is in a way the exact opposite of a sociology of mathematics. Sociology of mathematics is a discipline that investigates the conditions that enable mathematicians to practice mathematics. Mathematical sociology is, on the other hand, one of many possible applications of mathematics. In the first case, the human lifeworld is ontologically primary; people engage in symbolic interaction in order to do mathematics, whatever that means. In the latter, mathematical entities…


Considering the old question: “What is philosophy?”

While completing my thesis at the University of Louvain, I began to wonder about the implications of the philosophical process. As many writers have noted before, the act of writing itself tends to re-sensitize the writer to the discrepancy, an almost insurmountable gap between thought, speech and the written word. Thinking back 5 years, when I first decided to take up philosophical writing as a vocation, that was exactly how long it took me to minimize the distance, between what I wanted to write and what I actually wrote. Considering how little I…


Reflections on George Orwell, Aldous Huxley and Michel Foucault

It has become a fashion of dystopian writing and thinking to place George Orwell and Aldous Huxley side by side. Both writers were obsessed with power and the means to resist its all-pervading effects. But despite the clear similarities in subject-matter, they seem to offer very different accounts of the real danger behind power, as well as the means by which power gets a hold of us and how we can identify it to counter its influence. They offer varying interpretations of how power tends to either hide and reproduce itself anonymously or reveal itself in order to dazzle, scare…


“Where Are We Now?” Agamben’s Intervention

This small 100 page book was written by Giorgio Agamben and it could turn out to be the “Communist Manifesto” of the 21st century. It addresses the most deeply hidden hypocrisies concerning the current pandemic and the lockdown measures. The title of the first chapter speaks for itself: “The Invention of the Epidemic”, and it only gets worse from there. Agamben makes several radical pronouncements in his work. The discourse revolves around the central claim that the Pandemic is a political order of things in and of itself. …


Toward a Bio-Political Critique of Mathematical Language

The following text will attempt to provide a critical history, or counter-history of mathematical knowledge by combining the philosophical legacies of two prominent 20th-century thinkers. Ludwig Wittgenstein and Michel Foucault. Ludwig Wittgenstein offers one of the most controversial accounts of mathematical knowledge.

Wittgenstein’s philosophy of mathematics has often been termed (radical) conventionalism. It entails the rejection of any Platonic abstract realm of mathematical entities along with Empiricist, Formalist, and Intuitionistic accounts of proof. According to Wittgenstein, mathematical objects do not exist, there are no mathematical discoveries, and mathematics as such is not descriptive, but rather prescriptive.

Mathematics imposes a set…

Giorgi Vachnadze

Philosopher

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